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Author Topic: Valve clearance check and adjustment on a KTM 990.  (Read 55316 times)
Paochow
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« on: November 09, 2007, 07:41:54 PM »

This thread is for reference only. It is not a substitution for the service manual or common sense. Use these instructions at your own risk.  All content is copyright 2007 of paochow.com. Content can not be reproduced, reprinted, reposted, etc. without permission of paochow.com.
 


Tools required: 14mm hex socket/wrench, A set of quality metric 6 point sockets and ratchets (I’ve done this with just a Craftsman ¼ ratchet set and used the wheel to turn over the engine) box wrenches, allen wrenches/sockets, torque wrench (having two; low torque under 25ft/lb), oil, shim kit/access to additional shims, feeler gauge, calculator, magnet, rags, flashlight, digital camera, and beer.

Time required: First time this may take you the good part of a day or so, especially if you have to swap shims.  After you’ve done it a few times, simple valve checks take about 3 hours or less.

CLICK PHOTOS TO ENLARGE

1.   Clean your bike, Having a clean bike is easier to work on and prevents dirt from falling into the engine. I prefer to put the bike up on the centerstand, but you could get by without doing so.



2.   Remove the seat via the ignition key on the lock on the left side of the bike.  If you can’t figure this out you may want to take the bike to the dealer.



3.   You will be removing a number of different fastners.  If this is your first time getting intimate with your bike and you lose track of what goes where do the following.  Take a magnetic tray and lay a piece of paper inside.  Then grid off the paper and label the various sections of the bike.  This makes it easier to keep track of what came from where.


4.   Remove the upper fairings right and left via five 5mm hex head bolts.  When removing each fairing you will need to detach the blinker wire and carbon canister tubing, if present.  This would be a good time to perform the canisterectomy if you haven’t already done so.  Don’t lose the aluminum bushings on each of the bolts. 



5.   Remove the crash bars from the bike if present.  Due to the various models of bars available consult the mounting instructions for the bars.




6.   Remove the glovebox surrounding via six Phillips screws.


7.   SHUT OFF the gas.  Disconnect the fuel lines to the petcocks.  I installed a quick release on the left side balance line to ease removal.  Remove the left side gas tank via three 6mm hex bolts (two if you already removed one with the crash bars).  Then disconnect the top “balance line” using needle nose pliers. 




8.   This step is easier with two people but if solo, put a set of needle nose pliers and a small regular screw driver in your back pocket. Then lift upward on the tank to clear the lip on the top allen bolt mount. Then set the rear of the tank on the footpeg (rubber cover optional but recommended).  Proceed to disconnect the two electrical disconnects (fuel pump and fuel light).  Use the small screwdriver to push down on the release if they are stubborn.  Also disconnect the quick release fuel line and the vent line.  Remove the tank and set aside.



9.   Remove the right tank in the same manner.  This side is easier as you will only have one vent line to deal with.  Remove and set aside.

10.   Remove the two 10mm front skid plate bolts.  If you like you can remove the whole plate via the two 10mm rear bolts.




11.   Remove the skid plate top via two 10mm bolts.  Mine were already removed with the crash bars.


12.   If you don’t like working on a live bike, remove the two 6mm bolts on the battery box and disconnect the negative terminal of the battery.


13.   Now is a good time to dust off the frame, air box, and surroundings as you will be opening up the airbox next.


14.   Remove the two 8mm bolts on each side of the fuse box.  Remove the fuse cover.


15.   Next remove the glovebox lid/base assembly by removing the four 8mm bolts.


16.   Next up disconnect the SAS airbox vent, if you still have one.  My SAS fell off during the creation of this write-up. Hmmmm mysterious.  Also remove the crankcase breather vent tube and intake air sensor electrical connector.




17.   Now back out the eight 6mm screws securing the airbox lid.  You don’t need to remove the screws completely, only back them out until they “float”.  Stuff some rags in the intact tracts for now.


18.   Turn the intake bells counterclockwise to remove them.  Lift out the air filter.





19.   Pull the assorted tubing/wires to the side out of the way.  Remove the intake snorkel or prefilter with four 6mm screws.


20.   The next step is easier if you disassemble the throttle assembly. So remove the two 8mm bolts and detach the cables from the throttle tube.


21.   Now undo the three 6mm screws on each side of the airbox securing the triangular access plates. Take off each of the plates.


22.   Now disconnect the throttle cables and undo the nuts securing them to the throttle bodies.  Don’t lose the rubber spacer on the throttle cables.




23.   Now disconnect the large gray electrical connector on the right side of the bike.  There is a small push tab release on the topmost corner to remove the connector from the frame mount.  After releasing this then use the release tab on the bottom of the connector to disconnect it.



24.   Next disconnect the pesky SAS valve from the back of the airbox. Note the routing of the fuel line as you will be removing the throttle bodies next. 



25.   Back out the bottom two 6mm bolts securing the throttle bodies to the intake tract.  Now gently work the airbox/throttle body assembly upward and free of the bike.    The two rubber/metal spacers may come off at this point, if so reinstall them in the bottom of the airbox, metal side down with the squared off portion towards the flattened portion of the airbox.




26.   Stuff rags in the intake tract and clean the valve covers and surrounding area.  Slide the throttle cables up and out of the way. Clean the valve cover and surrounding area.


27.   Slide the SAS to the left and out of the way.  Or if you have blanking plates, aftermarket exhaust and a ¼ watt 15K-22K Ohm resistor take it off now.

a.   SAS removal should be a piece of cake, remove the two exhaust injection ports and swap them with blanking plates.  Unfortunately it is easier said than done as the two 8mm bolts on the front cylinder are a PITA to remove.  I ended up using a small 8mm wrench and some needle nose vice grips for added leverage and then slowly backed the bolts out.


b.   Once removed mount the blanking plates with some High Temp RTV Silicone and the original mounting bolts.  I thought my plates were backwards, but they only mounted that way.


c.   Clip the wire on the SAS and solder a ¼ watt 15K-22K Ohm resistor in its place.
d.   Mission accomplished- SAS removed.

28.   Remove the four 8mm bolts securing the radiator and let it lean forward for more clearance.



29.   Next remove the spark plug/ignition coils.  Unclip each connector and pull out the coil assembly.  Spray some compressor air down each of the plug holes to clean out the dirt, although you don’t need to remove the plugs.



30.   Detach the two rubber vent hoses from the front valve cover.


31.   Remove the four 10mm bolts securing each valve cover.  Carefully lift each valve cover off and out of the way.



32.   Remove the 14mm plug on the left side of the engine.



33.   Utilizing a 14mm hex socket/key turn the engine over in the counterclockwise direction. We will start by setting the rear cylinder to TDC. Watch the cam gears and you will see a small dot on the outside edge of the cam gear.  Turn the engine until the mark lines up with the edge of the cylinder head.  If you look on the right side of the engine you will notice that the dots are present on both camshafts and should be lined up with the cylinder head edge. Both cam lobes should faced towards each other as shown.



34.   Use a feeler gauge to check the clearance for the between the cam lobe and bucket  on the two intake valves.  Clearance should be 0.10mm-0.15mm.  The feeler gauge should have a slight drag when inserting/removing on the correct measurement.  Write down your measurements.


35.   Use a feeler gauge to check the clearance for the between the cam lobe and bucket  on the two exhaust valves.  Clearance should be 0.25mm-0.30mm.  The feeler gauge should have a slight drag when inserting/removing on the correct measurement.  Write down your measurements.


36.   If the clearances are in spec, you are ready to proceed to the front cylinder, so  skip to step 52.  If not, proceed to the next step..

37.   Now you will remove the cam of the valve that is not in spec.  First you will need to open the engine locking bolt hole. To do so remove the 10mm bolt with a copper washer on the lower right side of the engine. 



38.   Now turn over the engine using the 14mm hex and turn it until right before the dot on the cam is near the cylinder head.  Take a flashlight and shine it in the hole of the bolt you just removed.  As you approach the part where the dots on the cams align with the cylinder head edge you will notice a notch in the crank through the bolt hole.  Align this notch in the center of the hole and use the locking bolt to lock the engine in place.




39.   Remove the spark plug well by pulling firmly and swearing profusely.



40.   Remove the eight 5mm hex bolts very carefully.  If you drop one down the cam chain hole you may be writing a how-to on engine disassembly.


41.   Carefully remove the cam bridge. Fortunately the mounting studs seem to be firmly fixed in the bridge.


42.   Remove the cam of the offending valve.  Make one more note of it’s position prior to removal.


43.   Now grab your strongest magnet and fix it on the center of the bucket.  When you pull up the shim should be in the bucket.  If not (as shown) use your magnet to remove it from a top of the valve stem. Only remove one shim/bucket at once or you will lose track of which is right and left.



44.   Measure Using a micrometer measure the thickness of the shim.


45.   Then use the following formula to calculate the new shim size. Make sure all of your calculations are in the same unit (in or mm). Put the new shim on top of the valve and reinstall the bucket.


New Shim Size=Measured Clearance - Desired Clearance + Existing Shim Size
 
46.   If necessary, remove, measure, calculate and swap the other shim if necessary.

47.   Reinstall the cam making note of the dot and the cylinder head edge.  If you think it is off, lift and rotate one tooth.  It should be pretty obvious which position is right on.


48.   Adjust other cam and valves if necessary, repeating steps 42-47.
49.   Oil all of the surfaces with synthetic oil.
50.   Carefully install cam bridge, making sure it seats completely before tightening. Tighten the larger bolts to 10Nm, then the smaller bolts to 10Nm and finally torque the larger bolts to 18Nm.


51.   REMOVE THE ENGINE LOCKING BOLT.


52.   Now you will proceed to the front cylinder. Now we will turn the front cylinder to TDC. Watch the cam gears and you will see a small dot on the outside edge of the cam gear.  This is a bit harder to see due to the radiator fan and coolant lines.  Turn the engine until the mark lines up with the edge of the cylinder head.  Again the dots on both camshafts and should be lined up with the cylinder head edge. This time the cam lobes should face away from each other as shown.


53.   Use a feeler gauge to check the clearance for the between the cam lobe and bucket  on the two intake valves.  Clearance should be 0.10mm-0.15mm.  The feeler gauge should have a slight drag when inserting/removing on the correct measurement.  Write down your measurements.


54.   Use a feeler gauge to check the clearance for the between the cam lobe and bucket  on the two exhaust valves.  Clearance should be 0.25mm-0.30mm.  The feeler gauge should have a slight drag when inserting/removing on the correct measurement.  Write down your measurements.

55.   If any of the valves are out of spec repeat steps 37-51 for the front cylinder.  Everything is the same except for the fact that you will be setting the front cylinder at TDC, rather than the rear cylinder.



56.   Once complete again MAKE SURE YOU REMOVE THE LOCKING BOLT.

57.   Install the valve covers making sure the front one contains the two vent hoses. Ensure the spark plug gasket and half moon rubber pieces seat properly. Reinstall the four 10mm bolts on each head and torque the bolts to 10 Nm.



58.   Reattach the two rubber vent hoses


59.   Reinstall the ignition coils, pushing down firmly to seat them.  Reconnect the wiring connectors.


60.   Reinstall 14 mm cap on engine, don’t forget O-ring.


61.   Bolt the radiator back into place using the four 10mm bolts.



62.   Reinstall the airbox, making sure to route the fuel line, grey electrical connector and airbox drain tube when pushing the box into place. Once all this is complete, line up the boots properly. Once everything is lined up properly, push into place.



63.   Once you feel the boots are in pace, inspect with a flashlight to make sure they are properly placed and there will be no air leaks. Then tighten the four 6 mm bolts on the band clamps.



64.   Next, slide the throttle cables back into position. Determine which is the push and which is the pull cable. Install pull cable on top and push cable on the bottom. Tension cables appropriately.


65.   Reattach the throttle cables to the throttle tube and reinstall the throttle assembly. Double check throttle cable play ensuring there is a slight amount of play as the handlebars are turned. Reattach grey electrical connector and reattach to tab on frame.



66.   Now reinstall airbox access triangles.


67.   Reinstall rubber spacer around throttle cables near airbox entry.


68.   Reinstall airbox snorkel or prefilter.


69.   Reinstall air filter and intake tubes.


70.   Reinstall airbox lid with eight 6mm screws. Making sure to reconnect intake air sensor and crank case breather hose.



71.   Connect fuse box to glovebox base using the two fine thread 8mm screws.


72.   Next reattach the glovebox lid/base assembly with four 8mm bolts.


73.   Reconnect battery and reassemble battery box. Reconnect negative terminal on battery. Reinstall battery box cover with 2 screws.


74.   Reinstall skid plate top.

75.   Reinstall skid plate using four 10 mm bolts.



76.   Reinstall right gas tank. Making sure to reattach vent hose. Reinsert three 6 mm Allen bolts.

77.   Reconnect upper and lower balance line to right side gas tank. Route upper balance line to left tank.


78.   Reinstall left gas tank. Making sure to reattach 2 electrical connectors, vent hose, upper and lower balance tubes, and main fuel line. Reinsert three 6 mm Allen bolts.


79.   Open fuel petcocks on both tanks.



80.   Reinstall crash bars, following manufacturers’ instructions.


81.   Reinstall right and left upper fairing panels. Using 5 Allen bolts on each side. Don’t forget to attach blinker wires and any canister tubing if applicable. Note: shorter Allen bolts go in the middle of the fairing. Don’t forget aluminum bushings.


82.   Reinstall the glovebox surrounding via six Phillips screws.



83.   Double check fasteners and ride your bike.


11/20/07: I've had several emails regarding where to buy shims.  The easiest is likely your local dealer, especially if you only need a shim or two.  However if you need multiple shims or want to build up a mini shim bank, head down to your local Harley Davidson Dealer.  The Harley Davidson V-rod and Buell 1125R both use 10mm shims, and since both are considered performance engines, the shims they use are of equal quality to those in your KTM.  The shims they sell are available in half sizes which aren't even available from KTM (i.e. 2.425mm)  The best part is the price, only $2.40 a shim, less than half of what KTM charges, meaning you can make a 20 shim mini kit for only $48.  Here are the part numbers for the most common shims you will need...

Part#          Shim size (mm)
18666-01K   2
18624-01K   2.025
18667-01K   2.5
18625-01K   2.075
18668-01K   2.1
18626-01K   2.125
18669-01K   2.15
18627-01K   2.175
18670-01K   2.2
18628-01K   2.225
18671-01K   2.25
18629-01K   2.275
18672-01K   2.3
18630-01K   2.325
18673-01K   2.35
18631-01K   2.375
18674-01K   2.4
18632-01K   2.425
18675-01K   2.45
18638-01K   2.475
18676-01K   2.5
18639-01K   2.525
18677-01K   2.55
18655-01K   2.575
18678-01K   2.6
18656-01K   2.625
18679-01K   2.65
18657-01K   2.675
18680-01K   2.7
18658-01K   2.725
18681-01K   2.75
18659-01K   2.775
18682-01K   2.8
18692-01K   2.825
18683-01K   2.85
18693-01K   2.875
18684-01K   2.9
18694-01K   2.925
18685-01K   2.95
18695-01K   2.975
18686-01K   3
« Last Edit: November 21, 2007, 09:42:31 AM by Paochow » Logged

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Paochow
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2007, 04:06:52 PM »

Updated with a cheap source for 10mm shims.
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Paochow
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2008, 02:43:28 PM »

Here is a handy shim calculator created by Kamanya on ADVrider.com

http://www.paochow.com/Shims.xls
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kerker
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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2008, 11:06:07 AM »

Thanks for the info. I may attempt adjusting my valves on my 950 at the next service. Thumbs up
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Droopy
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« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2008, 03:51:06 PM »

Paowchow, thanks for the great info! As a new owner of a 2008 990 S, I have learned a lot from your forum. Currently I am in the middle of doing the 600 mile first service,(no dealer near me works on KTM street bikes) and I was wanting to know if your clearance on your bike was to tight or to loose? My bikes clearance is really tight compared to the specified measurement. Also when I went to turn over the engine with the 14mm hex bolt/AH EXPAND. Screw, it came loose and started to back out! NOT GOOD! Super good info on where to purchase shims since it seems like my local dealer blows goats Cheesy

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Paochow
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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2008, 06:27:05 AM »

Also when I went to turn over the engine with the 14mm hex bolt/AH EXPAND. Screw, it came loose and started to back out! NOT GOOD!


Better KTM forgetting to tighten that than the clutch bolts. Angry
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Droopy
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« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2008, 10:58:39 AM »

I dont know about you but when I pay top dollar for a bike I dont want any internal bolts coming loose, or for that matter I dont want any bolts at all coming loose. Also when I was doing my valve adjustment my SAS also fell off, humm weird, can you tell me if there is a direction of "flow" for the resistor that you put in, or does it not matter? 
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Paochow
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« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2008, 06:40:38 AM »

Resistor flow should not matter.
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wonderbread950
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« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2008, 05:01:16 PM »

I am doing my valve adjustment and am debatining on the SAS removal. I read on other forums that removing the SAS without a Caterectomy could plug up the cats. I do eventually plan on ditching the cats but it may be a year or so before I have the extra grand lying around. Whats your opinion on removing the SAS without the cats? Would a year of riding (10,000 miles) be a risky choice by possibly damaging the engine? Undecided
« Last Edit: August 27, 2008, 04:15:42 PM by wonderbread950 » Logged
Paochow
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« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2008, 06:44:01 PM »

I've read the same thing.  I'd lean towards sticking with the SAS if you run the stock pipes unless you want to do major surgery (i.e. cat removal on the pipes.)
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Vtktm
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« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2009, 03:46:56 PM »

Top shelf..... a great step x step post Thumbs up
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07 Ktm 990s
   05 Ktm 450 ex/c
pdxmille
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« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2009, 12:47:35 AM »

It was wonderful to find this thread, as I needed 10mm shims for my Aprilia Mille.  I was so happy to see the Harley Vrod shim part numbers and sizes listed.  I attempted to order a "shim kit" for my bike, consisting of 2-3 shims of each size I would need for my adjustment now, and in the future.

I ordered the shims online from one Harley dealer, only to receive an email stating I was required to order a minimum of FIVE in each size.  I told them to cancel my $60 order.  Attempted to order the shims from my local Harley dealer, only to be told I needed to order FIVE of each size.  I said no thanks.

Wow, my first experience with harley Davidson, and it was a bad one....   hmmmm...guess I'll never be buying a Harley if that is an example of their customer service....idiots... Roll Eyes

Just thought you all should know...
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Paochow
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« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2009, 05:00:50 AM »

Harley seems to be hit or miss for customer service it seems.  Appleton HD of Wisconsin and Barnett HD of El Paso were both able to order single shims for me in the past so you could try them.
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